National security – Anti Nationale http://antinationale.org/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 10:07:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://antinationale.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/anti.png National security – Anti Nationale http://antinationale.org/ 32 32 National Security Bill Proposes ASD to Perform Home Espionage in ‘Life and Death’ Situations | Canberra weather https://antinationale.org/national-security-bill-proposes-asd-to-perform-home-espionage-in-life-and-death-situations-canberra-weather/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://antinationale.org/national-security-bill-proposes-asd-to-perform-home-espionage-in-life-and-death-situations-canberra-weather/ news, federal politics, john blaxland, karen andrews, asio, asd, national security, stoltz The laws proposed to expand and streamline Australia’s espionage and intelligence operations will allow an agency to spy on Australians in the country for the first time in nearly 75 years of existence. But while experts say the changes will not result in […]]]>

news, federal politics, john blaxland, karen andrews, asio, asd, national security, stoltz

The laws proposed to expand and streamline Australia’s espionage and intelligence operations will allow an agency to spy on Australians in the country for the first time in nearly 75 years of existence. But while experts say the changes will not result in a nationwide spy regime of Snowden proportions, they have warned that more obscure intelligence agencies need “a dose of the sun” to increase public confidence in privacy protections further deteriorated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Home Secretary Karen Andrews on Thursday morning introduced yet another national security bill to the lower house, which would implement a number of changes proposed in a landmark review of the former head of the ASIO, Dennis Richardson. The bill, which amends nine pieces of legislation, would finally allow the Australian Signals Branch to begin collecting intelligence on transmissions from people in the country without the need for a warrant if there is an imminent risk to them. life. It will also provide the Signals Agency with the ability to conduct domestic espionage on suspected terrorism suspects and collect intelligence in conjunction with the Australian Defense Force for military operations with ministerial authorization. “The measures I have outlined in the bill are designed to address or alleviate the critical operational challenges facing the national intelligence community,” Ms. Andrews said. “This reflects the government’s commitment to continuously improve Australia’s robust national security laws to keep Australians safe and our way of life protected.” The agencies, which also include the ASIO, the Australian Geospatial-Intelligence Organization, and the overseas-focused Australian Secret Intelligence Service, will be required to publicly post privacy policies on their sites. The parliamentary security and intelligence committee will be able to examine and scrutinize these rules of confidentiality. It comes more than three years after former News Corp reporter Annika Smethurst reported a memo leak between senior officials discussing the granting of extraordinary powers to listen to warrantless Australians. Ms Smethurst was raided the following year, with the alleged perpetrator of the leaked document. Police dropped the charges last year. National Security College policy adviser Dr William Stoltz said these proposals were very different from the initial plans for ASDs first reported by Ms Smethurst in 2018. Narrow scope of powers to be used only in potentially events mortals made them proportionate, he mentioned. “These are really those urgent, life and death, pretty urgent times when you need an ASD to be able, within hours, to gather information,” said Dr Stoltz. “Because doing it in the established way, which is in close partnership with other agencies, takes a little too much time and time. But her colleague at Australian National University, Professor John Blaxland, said the federal government and the national intelligence community needed to be more transparent to ensure greater public confidence in the powerful laws being proposed. The general public had developed a “bruised and damaged image” of national security concerns following the raids on Ms Smethurst, he said. READ MORE: Offering sweeping powers coupled with a recent rise in mistrust of authority could push some further into the arms of extremist fringe groups. “If we want to avoid adding to the momentum of the conspiratorial cause, we must give [them] a dose of sun, ”he said. “The fallout from the Annika Smethurst fiasco has left a bruised and damaged image of impartiality, impartial balance, national security concerns with the demands of an open democratic society. “I think ASD needs to be more transparent, just as ASIO has sought to be more transparent.” Beyond expanding the powers of the signals directorate, the proposed laws will also extend domestic intelligence gathering capabilities to secret intelligence services and the geospatial intelligence agency. The wide range of new powers proposed for intelligence agencies will be given to the relevant Professor Blaxland. While he believes ASIO has made strides in being transparent and assuring the public of the work they do, other agencies remain hidden and shy of public awareness. And while national security has continued to grow dramatically over the past two decades, its oversight body, the Inspector General of Intelligence and Security, has not. The former director of military intelligence said IGIS needed funds and resources to ensure that national intelligence agencies were doing their jobs properly. “I am a former practitioner, I am a former initiate but having worked on the history of intelligence, I have a much better appreciation of the need for checks and balances,” he said. “Because power tends to corrupt. “My concern is that the legislation we are proposing is written by insiders, it is written with their own concerns in mind. “What I’m saying is that [IGIS oversight] must be taken up a notch further. “

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/106459643/bfafec29-4ad5-4fad-b19b-6640b2eae439.jpg/r14_500_4989_3311_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg

SUBSCRIBER

]]>
Government to ‘strengthen national security’ with new laws and training https://antinationale.org/government-to-strengthen-national-security-with-new-laws-and-training/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 03:11:05 +0000 https://antinationale.org/government-to-strengthen-national-security-with-new-laws-and-training/ Administration and Justice Secretary Andre Cheong told members of the region’s Legislative Assembly on Wednesday that the government intends to strengthen national security in 2022, through new laws and regulations. ‘training activities in schools and public services. When discussing the details of the political speech (GAL) for 2022, Cheong said the government would introduce an […]]]>

Administration and Justice Secretary Andre Cheong told members of the region’s Legislative Assembly on Wednesday that the government intends to strengthen national security in 2022, through new laws and regulations. ‘training activities in schools and public services.

When discussing the details of the political speech (GAL) for 2022, Cheong said the government would introduce an amendment to the “Defense of State Security Law”. The guidelines, which were presented last week by Macau’s chief executive, set this amendment as one of its targets – the first since 2009.

“During the twelve years of the law on the defense of state security, the international security situation and that of neighboring regions have changed, so that the guarantees of the legal system of the government of the region Macao Special Administrative Council for the Defense of the State Security must also evolve with the times in order to safeguard the sovereignty, security and development interests of the State, so as to effectively prevent and suppress foreign interventions and to guarantee effectively the rights and legitimate interests of residents as well as the prosperity and stability of society, ”the policy address read.

Among the 17 bills to be introduced next year, there is one on the “Macao Special Administrative Region secrecy regime”.

The aim of this law is also to strengthen the protection of state and Macao security through what it calls a “specific regime of secrecy, establishing strict and secure measures relating to secrecy, in order to ensure that State and Macao secrets Special Administrative Regions are adequately protected.

Cheong also promised that next year officials will participate in training sessions on the Chinese Constitution and the region’s Basic Law, the State Security Defense Law, Chinese culture, among others, in the goal “to deepen the sense of national identity of civil servants and increase their capacity to carry out the work of government action.”

For 2022, patriotism is also to be strengthened in schools and associations through “various legal dissemination activities relating to the Constitution, the Basic Law, the law on the defense of the security of the State and the fundamental laws related to daily life “.

]]>
National security law allowing secret trial of Witness J under scrutiny – Government, public sector https://antinationale.org/national-security-law-allowing-secret-trial-of-witness-j-under-scrutiny-government-public-sector/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 20:35:57 +0000 https://antinationale.org/national-security-law-allowing-secret-trial-of-witness-j-under-scrutiny-government-public-sector/ To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com. There has been a sustained national debate over whistleblower prosecutions in recent years, with the main concern being national security laws that allow the trials of Witnesses K, Bernard Collaery and David McBride to be shrouded in secrecy. But the covert criminal prosecutions that are […]]]>

To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com.

There has been a sustained national debate over whistleblower prosecutions in recent years, with the main concern being national security laws that allow the trials of Witnesses K, Bernard Collaery and David McBride to be shrouded in secrecy.

But the covert criminal prosecutions that are taking the cake are those of the former Commonwealth official known as Witness J, who was tried, convicted and sentenced by the ACT Supreme Court without the public knowing. and the transcript of the proceedings was then retained.

Judged under the pseudonym Alan Johns, Witness J appeared in court in 2018. The former intelligence officer had received a high-level security clearance. But following a periodic review, this was revoked due to concerns about his conduct and his job was subsequently terminated.

After losing his job, Witness J filed a series of complaints with the agency about his unfair treatment by unsecured means, which could have endangered the lives of others. And that led to him being taken into custody and charged with several counts of violating national security provisions.

Once the case uncovered, the secrecy surrounding it led commentators to reaffirm that secret trials have no place in a liberal democracy, like Australia, where open justice is seen as a key element of Right wing state.

And due to widespread misgivings about the case, the Independent Observatory for National Security Law is currently reviewing the law allowing closed court proceedings, which is contained in Article 22 of the 2004 Law on National Security. information on national security (criminal and civil proceedings) (Cth).

Witness J pleaded guilty to five unknown counts which together were characterized as “abuse of classified information”. He was then sentenced to 2 years and 7 months imprisonment in the ACT, and was released after 15 months for good behavior.

“We only found out about this case by happy coincidence,” Human Rights Law Center (HRLC) senior lawyer Kieran Pender told Sydney Criminal Lawyers last week. And he added that it is promising that INSLM is now revising the secrecy provision.

Alan Johns’ trial only came to public attention after Witness J filed a complaint with the courts over a decision by Australian Federal Police to raid his cell in Alexander Maconochie Center in Canberra in February 2019 in order to confiscate a brief he had written.

In November of the same year, Senator Rex Patrick asked then-Attorney General Christian Porter about the case, who indicated in his response that he had given his consent for the prosecution to continue. , that all parties had accepted the confidentiality order, and that J chose his own lawyer.

“The NSI Act balances the need to protect national security information with the principle of open justice and gives the court broad powers to make any orders it deems appropriate on such matters,” Porter explained.

Article 22 of the NSI Act provides that at any time during the criminal proceedings, the Attorney General, the prosecutor and the defendant “may agree to an arrangement regarding the disclosure, protection, storage, processing or destruction, during the procedure, of information relating to national security ”. .

As part of the review, the current INSLM Grant Donaldson SC held a public hearing on June 21 of this year with a number of interested parties, which included Pender’s contribution.

The lawyer told INSLM that, from HRLC’s point of view, there was no room for secret trials in this country and that the INS law needed urgent reform. the continuation of the scenario of Witness J. And he underlined that the principle of open justice is particularly relevant in the penal context.

The Human Rights Law Center made three safeguard recommendations, which included appointing an advocate for open justice, requiring the court to give public reasons why a secrecy order should be enforced, and creating a ‘a “library of secret judgments”.

“The central point is that there has to be some openness,” Pender said during his testimony. “We do not accept that there are circumstances which would justify these arrangements being repeated.”

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

]]>
Hong Kong activist sentenced to 43 months under national security law https://antinationale.org/hong-kong-activist-sentenced-to-43-months-under-national-security-law/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 18:31:06 +0000 https://antinationale.org/hong-kong-activist-sentenced-to-43-months-under-national-security-law/ BANGKOK – Hong Kong student activist Tony Chung was sentenced to three years and seven months in prison on Tuesday after pleading guilty to secession and money laundering charges under the city’s national security law. Chung, 20, is the youngest person sentenced under Hong Kong’s national security law since China’s imposition of the measure last […]]]>

Hong Kong student activist Tony Chung was sentenced to three years and seven months in prison on Tuesday after pleading guilty to secession and money laundering charges under the city’s national security law.

Chung, 20, is the youngest person sentenced under Hong Kong’s national security law since China’s imposition of the measure last year.

He pleaded guilty to one count of secession and one count of money laundering in plea bargaining. Under these conditions, the authorities dropped a second count of money laundering as well as a count of sedition.

After pleading guilty on November 3, Chung said, “I have no shame in my heart,” local media reported.

His plea deal on Tuesday earned him a 25% reduction in his sentence, meaning Chung will serve 40 months simultaneously for secession and 18 months for money laundering, with just three months of the latter sentence being served separately.

Political scientist Joseph Cheng, formerly from Hong Kong but now living in New Zealand, believes the 43-month sentence is too harsh.

“I certainly think the sentence is too severe. There appears to be an intention to create a deterrent effect. Advocating for independence, even in the absence of concrete action, will result in severe penalties, ”Cheng told VOA by email.

FILE: In this January 1, 2019 photo, pro-independence protester Tony Chung, right, marches at an annual New Years protest in Hong Kong.

The activist Chung is the former chairman of the youth activist group Studentlocalism, a pro-independence student organization founded in 2016. During his national security trial, prosecutors said Chung posted social media messages calling people to join the protests and get rid of Chinese colonization. to reign.

Authorities arrested the activist in October 2020 outside the US Embassy in Hong Kong. He was the first politician to face charges under the Security Act.

Weeks before his arrest, the then 19-year-old Chung spoke to VOA, describing his fears that Hong Kong authorities would arrest him soon. Last December, the young activist was sentenced to four months in prison after being sentenced under Hong Kong’s basic law for insulting the Chinese national flag during anti-government protests in 2019. The basic law is the legal system city ​​default.

FILE: Young supporters of former Studentlocalism leader Tony Chung wait in court in Hong Kong on October 29, 2020.

FILE: Young supporters of former Studentlocalism leader Tony Chung wait in court in Hong Kong on October 29, 2020.

Joseph Cheng said speaking in Hong Kong has become too dangerous.

“Already, people do not want to express themselves. Journalists struggle to find people to comment on sensitive topics; however, there are many activists in exile, and they will continue to express their views. In Hong Kong, people remain silent but the anger is there, ”he added.

Finn Lau, a Hong Kong activist in exile in Britain, told VOA that the conviction of Tony Chung would only encourage activists in Hong Kong.

“His conviction would push exiled Hong Kong activists, especially myself, to go the extra mile to counter the influence of the Chinese Communist Party in the world. It would not deter Hong Kong people.

“Since pro-democracy voices in Hong Kong, including newspapers, have been stifled, it is inevitable that genuine opinion of Hong Kong people will pass through Hong Kong people overseas,” he said.

Britain returned control of Hong Kong to China in 1997 under the Sino-British Joint Declaration, under which the city would enjoy a “high degree of autonomy” for 50 years. But activists in the city have complained that China has long encroached on those freedoms. China maintains that Hong Kong is an inalienable part of the country and that calls for independence have no legal basis.

After the 2019 anti-government protests, Beijing implemented the Hong Kong National Security Law, prohibiting secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign forces, and its details can be widely interpreted.

Since then, dozens of opposition activists and lawmakers have been arrested and await trial, while others have fled abroad. Slogans were banned, while pro-democracy books were taken from libraries and schools. In June, the pro-democracy Apple Daily closed its doors after 26 years of journalism with its founder Jimmy Lai in prison. At least 50 civil society groups have also disbanded since the security law came into force.

Chung is the third person to be sentenced under the Security Law for secession.

Activist Leon Tong Ying-Kit, 24, was the first person convicted under the law. In July, he was sentenced to nine years in prison following his conviction for terrorism and secession.

Activist Ma Chun-man, nicknamed “Captain America 2.0,” was sentenced to nearly six years in prison for inciting secession.

Both defendants had pleaded not guilty.

Eric Yan-ho Lai, legal and policy analyst and fellow at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, said Chung’s sentence was significantly lower after a guilty plea and could influence the pleas of future defendants to be tried under the guilty plea. security measure.

“The sentence imposed on Tony Chung would set an example for the following defendants under the National Security Act to consider whether or not they should plead guilty or not, as the sentence length is lighter than that of Ma and Tong who did not plead guilty. “

Lai added that the defendants are already feeling the pressure to plead guilty due to the costs of legal representation.

“The change in the surrounding environment, including the new legal aid system whereby defendants can no longer choose their own legal representation if they apply legal aid, therefore also create a combined effect of pressure on defendants. for them to consider pleading guilty or defending their words and deeds. in the courtroom.

The legal analyst questioned whether the crackdown on young opposition voices benefits Hong Kong in the long run.

“Governments will wonder if criminalizing young people with draconian laws can really regain public trust in justice or in governments,” he added.

]]>
A matter of national security: compliance of insurance companies with OFAC regulations – Insurance https://antinationale.org/a-matter-of-national-security-compliance-of-insurance-companies-with-ofac-regulations-insurance/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 09:38:39 +0000 https://antinationale.org/a-matter-of-national-security-compliance-of-insurance-companies-with-ofac-regulations-insurance/ To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com. Many in the insurance industry are blind to the fact that the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is hiding in the shadows. The federal agency of the US Department of the Treasury responsible for the administration, implementation and enforcement of economic sanctions programs, OFAC […]]]>

To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com.

Many in the insurance industry are blind to the fact that the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is hiding in the shadows. The federal agency of the US Department of the Treasury responsible for the administration, implementation and enforcement of economic sanctions programs, OFAC is on the lookout for bad actors – oppressive governments, drug traffickers, terrorists and others. Specially Designated Nationals and Stranded Persons (SDNs) who threaten our national security.

But what does OFAC’s interest in these criminals have to do with insurance-related entities? The answer to this question is clearly addressed in OFAC regulations, which prevent brokers, agents, insurers and reinsurers from issuing insurance policies and reinsurance contracts involving OFAC targets.

A little background

Several different federal laws, including the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and the Trading with the Enemy Act, authorize OFAC to administer and enforce economic sanctions against a long list of countries and League of Nations – those associated with the governments of countries. sanctioned.

As a general rule, it is strictly forbidden to engage in commercial or financial transactions with any person identified on the SDN list of OFAC. This applies to players in the insurance industry, who are required to exercise due diligence to ensure that they do not insure people and property designated as SDNs.

OFAC regulations prevail over state insurance laws

Those who work in the insurance industry may believe that only state insurance laws govern what they can and cannot do in terms of placing coverage and paying claims. But this is not the case when it comes to the authority of the OFAC in matters of insurance operations.

The issue of preemption was addressed nearly two decades ago in written FAQs published by the Treasury Department. Indeed, on September 10, 2002, the following question was formally asked regarding compliance for the insurance industry:

“State insurance laws regulate an insurer’s ability to withhold payment of claims, cancel policies, or refuse to enter into policies. In some cases, insurers must make an apparent violation of national insurance regulations to comply with OFAC regulations. Does OFAC have a position as to whether OFAC regulations prevail over national insurance regulations in this context? “

In response, the Treasury Department explained:

“OFAC’s regulations under the Trade with the Enemy Act and the International Emergency Economic Powers Act are based on Presidential Declarations of National Emergency and national regulations for assurance. OFAC regulations are not federal insurance regulations, they are national emergency regulations and powers. [Emphasis added.]”

Under this federal preemption, carriers must follow certain OFAC compliance procedures to ensure that policyholders and potential claimants are not on the SDN list or that the goods to be insured are not goods in which a SDN has an interest.

OFAC compliance

Screening: First step for any insurance company (1) preparing to issue an insurance policy, (2) making a change to an existing policy, or (3) reviewing a claim is a list review SDN. This must be done upon receipt of a proposal, claim or request for a change of named insured.

The screening requirement lasts throughout the life of a policy and must also be implemented before paying a claim. This is due to the possibility of changes occurring during a policy period resulting in the inclusion of an SDN which triggers OFAC regulations. Therefore, insurers should periodically check existing policyholders, claimants and beneficiaries against the SDN list.

Blocking and reporting: Then, if a match found on the SDN list is confirmed to be correct after proper investigation, the carrier must immediately notify OFAC and cease all transactions involving that identified person or entity, in which case the police will be considered ” well blocked. “

Likewise, the payment of any claim due to an SDN, or to be deposited or transferred through a bank on the SDN list, should be frozen. In addition, premium payments, interest payments on policy loans and repayments of policy loans related to blocked insurance policies must be credited to an “interest-bearing escrow account” established in the books of the company. an American financial institution.

There is more. OFAC regulations require insurers to report blocked assets to OFAC in a timely manner within 10 days of the blocking of such assets. In addition, carriers must file a full annual report on all goods stranded as of June 30 of the current year (deposit is due by September 30).

Rule violations and self-report: Failure to adhere to OFAC regulations (read: issuing policies or paying claims to those on the SDN list) results in significant civil and criminal penalties that can exceed several million dollars. That being said, insurance companies that have not complied with OFAC’s filtering, blocking or reporting requirements are encouraged to voluntarily disclose past violations.

OFAC considers such self-disclosure to be a mitigating factor in civil sanction proceedings. And while OFAC does not have an amnesty program, it does review all of the circumstances surrounding any violation, including the quality of a carrier’s OFAC compliance program.

Takeaway meals

Through OFAC regulations, insurers are responsible for doing their part to minimize threats to national security here in the United States. They can do this with the available OFAC compliance software and by implementing comprehensive OFAC compliance plans.

Originally posted by Insurance Journal.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

]]>
Priti Patel issues warning about threat of espionage activity to national security | Politics | New https://antinationale.org/priti-patel-issues-warning-about-threat-of-espionage-activity-to-national-security-politics-new/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 11:30:00 +0000 https://antinationale.org/priti-patel-issues-warning-about-threat-of-espionage-activity-to-national-security-politics-new/ In a speech in Washington, the Home Secretary said countries are now spying on “universities and businesses”. She warned that “malicious interference” is one of the “most significant security threats” facing the UK. China is now targeting universities, infrastructure and tech companies in the UK, it has been claimed. Ms Patel said: “Espionage is evolving. […]]]>

In a speech in Washington, the Home Secretary said countries are now spying on “universities and businesses”. She warned that “malicious interference” is one of the “most significant security threats” facing the UK.

China is now targeting universities, infrastructure and tech companies in the UK, it has been claimed.

Ms Patel said: “Espionage is evolving. Governments continue to spy on each other, but espionage is now much broader in scope, including in our universities and businesses.

“It’s not inherently inappropriate for countries to try to influence each other. That’s what I’m here for, after all. But we can never allow national security to be compromised.”

Ms Patel was addressing the Heritage Foundation think tank on the last day of a trip to Washington DC to strengthen security cooperation with the United States.

The interior minister said anti-espionage laws were being modernized to deal with changing threats, which are “uninhibited and growing”.

Strong relations with the United States are “absolutely essential” to protect the two countries from hostile activity.

Ms Patel added: ‘In the UK we will no longer tolerate such brazen attacks and the brazen way in which we have seen our national security subjected to such activities.

“Our future legislation will represent the largest legislation against state threats in decades.”

]]>
7 young Hong Kong activists facing national security charges – inc. 4 minors – back in court in January https://antinationale.org/7-young-hong-kong-activists-facing-national-security-charges-inc-4-minors-back-in-court-in-january/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 11:16:34 +0000 https://antinationale.org/7-young-hong-kong-activists-facing-national-security-charges-inc-4-minors-back-in-court-in-january/ The case of seven members of the Returning Valiant group – including four minors – has been adjourned until the end of January pending approval of legal aid. The group faces charges of conspiracy to incite subversion. Meanwhile, a 15-year-old defendant’s request for anonymity has been denied because she will be 16 next week, the […]]]>

The case of seven members of the Returning Valiant group – including four minors – has been adjourned until the end of January pending approval of legal aid. The group faces charges of conspiracy to incite subversion. Meanwhile, a 15-year-old defendant’s request for anonymity has been denied because she will be 16 next week, the judge said.

Alexandra “Grandma Wong” was seen outside the courthouse on November 20, 2021, waving a Union Jack, a regular at the protests. Photo: Selina Cheng / HKFP.

The accused were Yuen Ka-him, 16, Choi Wing-kit, 20, Leung Yung-wan, 16, Chan Yau-tsun, 25, Tseung Chau Ching-yu, 16, Kwok Man-hei, 18 years old, as well as the 15 year old girl. They were indicted in late September under Articles 22 and 23 of the National Security Law for instigating others to overthrow or undermine the governments of Hong Kong and China with or without the use or threat of force, as well as Articles 159A and 159C of the Conspiracy Crimes Ordinance.

A total of 15 members of the group were arrested for alleged possession of explosives and material bearing independence slogans between May and September. Seven of them – not included in the present case – have been charged with conspiracy to commit terrorist activities, including two 15-year-olds. Four other people have been charged with burglary of a school in Tseung Kwan O.

]]>
Ministry of Foreign Affairs: bilateral cooperation with India does not undermine national security https://antinationale.org/ministry-of-foreign-affairs-bilateral-cooperation-with-india-does-not-undermine-national-security/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:43:53 +0000 https://antinationale.org/ministry-of-foreign-affairs-bilateral-cooperation-with-india-does-not-undermine-national-security/ The Foreign Ministry said on Wednesday that bilateral cooperation between India and the Maldives does not jeopardize the national security of the Maldives. Addressing the “India Out” movement which is gaining ground on media and social media platforms, the ministry said in a press release that such claims were false. The ministry also said that […]]]>

The Foreign Ministry said on Wednesday that bilateral cooperation between India and the Maldives does not jeopardize the national security of the Maldives.

Addressing the “India Out” movement which is gaining ground on media and social media platforms, the ministry said in a press release that such claims were false.

The ministry also said that the country’s international relations are based on mutual respect and understanding, and in accordance with national and international laws, ensure that such relations will not undermine the national security of the Maldives.

“… Such interactions in the international sphere do not and will not compromise the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Maldives. In fact, they are designed to strengthen the national interests of the Maldives and serve the people of the Maldives. Maldives, ”the Foreign Ministry said.

The ministry further said it believed this was not how the public viewed the Maldives’ relationship with India, but rather the work of a small group of individuals determined to tarnish relations between the two. nations.

“India has always been the Maldives’ closest ally and trusted neighbor, providing constant and consistent support to the Maldivian people on all fronts.”

Citing the growth of global threats such as cross-border terrorism, piracy, drug trafficking and non-traditional security threats such as climate change, the ministry said it is difficult for a country to tackle these issues on its own.

The ministry urged the media to engage in responsible journalism while also reporting on these topics.

“The government of Maldives urges all parties to act responsibly and refrain from disseminating false information that undermines the country’s relations with its neighbors and the international community,” the foreign ministry said.

The Progressive Opposition Party of Maldives (PPM) and the National People’s Congress (PNC) staged a march this weekend where they expressed distrust and displeasure at the continued and increased Indian military presence. in the Maldives.

]]>
Critical technologies in the spotlight on national security https://antinationale.org/critical-technologies-in-the-spotlight-on-national-security/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 07:49:09 +0000 https://antinationale.org/critical-technologies-in-the-spotlight-on-national-security/ Quantum computing, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity services and autonomous vehicles will be the subject of increased government scrutiny, particularly with respect to foreign interference, as part of the federal government’s new framework and action plan on critical technologies. Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced the strategy at the Sydney Dialogue’s inaugural event, hosted by the Australian Strategic […]]]>

Quantum computing, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity services and autonomous vehicles will be the subject of increased government scrutiny, particularly with respect to foreign interference, as part of the federal government’s new framework and action plan on critical technologies.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced the strategy at the Sydney Dialogue’s inaugural event, hosted by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), on Wednesday morning.

The plan “aims to balance the economic opportunities of critical technologies with their risk to national security.”

“The technologically advanced nations have greater economic, political and military power. And in turn a greater ability to influence the norms and values ​​that will shape technological development in the years to come, ”Mr. Morrison said in the speech.

“Australia’s future security and prosperity depends on our participation in the technological revolutions that are shaping the world. The plan sets out a vision for the protection and promotion of critical technologies in our national interest.

“It aims to balance the economic opportunities of critical technologies with their national security tasks and it gives us the right framework to work nationally and with like-minded countries to work to further develop these technologies.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Credit: Naresh777 / Shutterstock.com

It includes a list of 63 critical technologies and nine areas of initial interest. Technologies included in the list will not immediately come under increased regulation, but are flagged as being on the government’s radar and potentially subject to further scrutiny in terms of foreign interference and investment.

The initial areas of focus of critical technologies are the extraction and processing of critical minerals, advanced communications, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity technologies, genomics and genetic engineering, novel antibiotics, antivirals and vaccines. , low-emission alternative fuels, quantum technologies and autonomous vehicles, drones, spin-offs and collaborative robotics.

“The list signals to government, industry and academia which technology is considered critical for Australia today or which is expected to become critical in the next decade. With this signal, we intend to foster consistency in decision making and focus our investments, ”said Mr. Morrison.

The list was created using an “advanced foresight capacity” within the Defense Science and Technology group and consultations with various stakeholders, including Universities Australia.

“The announcement recognizes the world-class research and reputation of Australian universities, as well as the role university experts play in shaping the country’s technological output,” said Universities Australia Managing Director Catriona Jackson.

“Australia’s ambition to promote and protect the sovereignty of intellectual property and assets is strongly supported by our members. It is essential for Australia’s economic and social well-being that we strike the right balance between working with global partners and understanding Australia’s own needs and priorities.

The plan lists several risks associated with critical technologies, including a lack of competitive and diverse markets, highly geographically concentrated supply chains, undermining of institutional integrity and the exploitation of Australian knowledge.

The new list and increased scrutiny of these technologies appears to be pointedly aimed at China’s growing technological powers, and an additional effort to discuss or prevent universities and researchers from collaborating with China on national security technologies, following the changes to foreign investment laws earlier this year.

“We will put Australia’s national interest, including its prosperity, security and social cohesion, at the heart of all critical technology investment and funding decisions,” the plan says.

“The risks associated with some forms of foreign investment have increased and evolved in a context of rapidly changing technology and the geopolitical landscape. The government will also continue to ensure that balanced and ongoing policies, controls and due diligence procedures – which screen and mitigate holistic risks to the national interest – apply to its own investment and investment decisions. supply. “

The new Critical Technologies Policy Coordination Office, housed within PM&C, also released an action plan to operationalize the master plan, saying that for each of the critical technologies on the list, the government will apply an “analytical framework. rigorous in determining where policy gaps exist or may emerge ”.

The action plan lists four types of options available to the government on these issues, ranging from plans and plans to restrictions and new laws.

In particular situations, the federal government will seek to directly regulate economic and social activity, or divert resources from areas previously supported by the private sector, and establish sovereign capacity in critical technology, as it pursues. with a national mRNA vaccine manufacturing capability.

It will also look at preventive support such as the Modern Manufacturing Fund and reactive support such as new task forces and the global visa regime.

The Prime Minister used the speech to try to divert attention from the controversial AUKUS deal with the United States and the United Kingdom on other critical technologies rather than on submarines, which should not be used before the 2040s.

“To state the obvious, AUKUS is much more than nuclear submarines. AUKUS is a broad and adaptable partnership that will drive our technological and capability cooperation to meet the challenges of the 21st century in our region, the Indo-Pacific region, ”said Mr. Morrison.

The initial focus will be on artificial intelligence, quantum technologies and underwater capabilities, and ministry officials have 90 days to report on a work plan for these technologies. The AUKUS agreement will involve the exchange of information, personnel and advanced technologies and capabilities between the three countries.

The blueprint and action plan come just days after the government unveiled new voluntary critical technology supply chain principles, which include a recommendation for companies to consider and seek guidance on influence from foreign governments on their technology providers.

Do you know more? Contact James Riley by email.

]]>
Nvidia’s-Arm buyout is subject to UK national security investigation https://antinationale.org/nvidias-arm-buyout-is-subject-to-uk-national-security-investigation/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 13:23:16 +0000 https://antinationale.org/nvidias-arm-buyout-is-subject-to-uk-national-security-investigation/ Jensen Huang, CEO of Nvidia Rick Wilking | Reuters LONDON – The UK government said on Tuesday it wanted a full investigation into Nvidia’s takeover of chip designer Cambridge Arm, which is widely regarded as the crown jewel of the UK tech industry. Digital and Cultural Secretary Nadine Dorries has ordered a “phase 2” investigation […]]]>

Jensen Huang, CEO of Nvidia

Rick Wilking | Reuters

LONDON – The UK government said on Tuesday it wanted a full investigation into Nvidia’s takeover of chip designer Cambridge Arm, which is widely regarded as the crown jewel of the UK tech industry.

Digital and Cultural Secretary Nadine Dorries has ordered a “phase 2” investigation into Nvidia’s $ 40 billion bid for Arm. The investigation – which will be conducted by the Competition and Markets Authority over the next 24 weeks – will investigate antitrust and national security concerns associated with the deal. The CMA said it had serious concerns about the deal after completing the initial “phase 1” investigation.

The takeover is under scrutiny by regulators around the world, and chip companies said in August that the deal was now unlikely to be reached before the original March 2022 deadline.

A spokesperson for Nvidia told CNBC on Tuesday: “We plan to respond to the CMA’s initial views on the impact of the transaction on competition, and we will continue to work with the UK government to resolve its issues.”

They added: “The Phase 2 process will allow us to demonstrate that the transaction will help accelerate Arm and drive competition and innovation, including in the UK.

Arm was formed from an early computer company called Acorn Computers in 1990. The company’s energy-efficient chip architectures are used in 95% of the world’s smartphones and 95% of chips designed in China.

The company, acquired by Japanese firm SoftBank in 2016 for £ 24 billion ($ 32 billion), licenses its chip designs to more than 500 companies that use them to make their own chips.

Critics fear the merger will restrict access to Arm’s “neutral” chip designs and lead to higher prices, less choice, and reduced innovation in the semiconductor industry. But Nvidia argues that the deal will lead to more innovation and that Arm will benefit from increased investment.

“This combination has huge benefits for both companies, our customers and the industry,” said Jensen Huang, CEO of Nvidia, when announcing the deal in September 2020.

Last month, the European Commission, the EU’s executive body, launched its own in-depth investigation into the deal, which is also under review by regulators in the United States and China.

“Although Arm and Nvidia are not in direct competition, Arm’s intellectual property is an important input into competing products from Nvidia’s, for example in data centers, automotive and the Internet of Things. ”, Said Margrethe Vestager, Executive Vice-President of the European Commission, in a statement. declaration.

“Our analysis shows that the acquisition of Arm by Nvidia could lead to restricted or degraded access to Arm’s intellectual property, with distorting effects in many markets where semiconductors are used,” he said. -she adds.

]]>